The discussion of the new "0.10" narrower RMS-C prompted the staff to do an updated study on optics for the Glock 43 system. Most optics are narrow enough to fit, but too long. The width on a 43 is such that it will accept any optic with a 1.0" width...maybe a 1.10" depending on the location of the screws. But the factory slide, with its rear sight placement limits use of certain optics because they will intrude excessively into the firing pin safety hole. Since placing the rear sight forward of the optic is a poor idea, the location of that dovetail becomes an important factor if designing a Glock 43 slide The RMR is too wide, but the Deltapoint is not, although the Deltapoint is too long. We have fit the Vortex Venom (and thus a Fastfire fits as well), Docter, J-Point, Shield RMS. There may be others we have not tried. Again, the limiting factor is the rear sight dovetail. When we bring out our Suarez Signature Glock 43 slides, that will not be an issue and any... Read more →


TACTICAL ROLE OF THE SHOTGUN?? In 1990 (more or less) Jeff Cooper began teaching shotgun at his place in AZ. To his credit, he researched the available material quite thoroughly to arrive at his conclusions, but I suspect he had an idea of where he wanted to take it before starting. Jeff was a rifleman and saw all small arms from that perspective. In a VHS tape of the era he explains why the shotgun needs a tight pattern and sights and the issue of slugs. While his class discussed the use of the buckshot pattern, it made most guys think of keeping the pattern "as tight as a fist" out as far as possible and then shooting slugs out as far as possible. In fact, many of the shotgun cadre encouraged all slug all the time. To that end a cottage industry grew around meeting Jeff's ideal of the fighting shotgun. Ghost ring sights were added, barrels were choked, shooting slings made up, and you name it. I would ask the reader, why they would choose a shotgun to... Read more →


So I received many emails about the last piece. Here is more on the discussion. An NPE pistol MUST be DA, or have a heavy trigger, because an NPE pistol will be carried without a holster. NPE, by the way, stands for NON-PERMISSIVE ENVIRONMENT. I would never carry a striker fired pistol that way for reasons mentioned. Specifically, the deeper the concealment...in pocket...in jock strap...without something protecting that short light trigger, you will in fact at some point, touch the trigger while accessing. And if the "touch" is during a time of duress, you will shoot yourself. It is not a training issue...it is a life and circumstance issue. Do it if you wish, but you will one day remember what I wrote here. Thus a Glock 42, 43, Shield and any SIG based on the 320 trigger - including the P365, is a Social Compromise Pistol and NOT an Non Permissive Environment Pistol. I will clarify the three basic carry categories below. They are based on the environment you will carry in and the legal/social/physical repercussions if discovered. Standard... Read more →


Access and Concealment work against each other. The more access 9or speed of access) you want, the less concealment you must settle for. Conversely the more concealment you want the more you compromise access. And access doesn't mean some IPSC speed draw...it simply means getting the weapon in hand, quickly under duress and possibly while moving. Concealment is relative. You don't need an undercover operative overseas' concealment for every day life in normal America. I go about my life in AZ with either a Glock 17 or 19 under anything between a simple T-shirt to a polartec hoodie. I have no issues hiding a big pistol like this. Sure it requires some clothing choices, but like I have said for the last twenty years...the gun comes first...the clothing comes second. Do that and you will see what you can carry. Sadly, most people do the opposite and buy the pistol they can hide in their skinny jeans and justin Beaver t-shirt. That said, there are times when you compromise. Sometimes the social requirements might preclude large pistol carry but concealment... Read more →


The Stakeout (or as the common people call it, a Tac-14 or Shockwave) is a different animal than a regular shotgun. Its like the difference between an AK and an AR. They are used in a different manner and from each other. First a discussion on the traditional use of a Shotgun with a bead. The stock and mount are crucial. Sports Shotgunners take great pains to fit their stocks because the stock places the face and the eye in the same place every time...hopefully anyway. The eye is in essence the rear sight...and the bead is the front sight. This works well enough unless you are shooting an extremely tight pattern...or slug rounds. With the Stakeouts, the rear sight...ie., the stock, is missing. And what happens is that Tac-14 (yes...I am going to use the words...Stockless Shotguns) users will always tend to shoot high. The reasons are two fold. One is the desire to keep the pistol grip lower than the face. Two is the way the stockless shotgun recoils (see the videos), back and down. Third is the... Read more →


Continuing with the discussions on marksmanship, an important pair of aspects are the issues of breathing and coordinating it with trigger press. One is strictly skill related, the other is skill and gear related. Breathing is a muscular action, whether voluntary or involuntary. The muscular action of breathing, or of holding the breath creates movement, which is the bane of a stable shooting platform. Not an issue in run-and-gun CQB, but a crucial consideration for accurate shooting anytime that a crucial shot is needed. In sniper school we teach the natural respiratory pause. And we find that method works admirably when shooting a pistol as well. We breathe normally...maybe taking a deep breath or two, and then allowing the air to expel naturally from the lungs without forcing it. At the point that the lungs feel "empty", you will have between 6 to 10 seconds of oxygenated blood flowing before the breathing must resume. Its during that period of time where, maintaining the visual focus on the sights or red dot, you begin pressing the trigger. That is the timing.... Read more →


Which one? Well, it depends. To simply suggest you always do it the same way regardless shows a complete lack of understanding about the fundamentals of marksmanship. So unless you can guarantee that all your gunfights will be in elevators with obese aggressors, read on. The question of sighting with with one eye or two eyes while shooting has been around for a long time. As in much of what we are doing, it is a matter of context and distance. If you are fighting a bad guy at five feet as you explode off the x, intent on shooting him to the ground, keeping both eyes open and focusing on the threat will work fine. Try the same thing at 7 yards, shooting past an innocent, and your results will not be as good. As most things, it depends on the problem at hand. Like degrees of movement (from stationary to sprinting), the use of the pistol's sights (from focus on sights to focus on threat), the rate of fire (from carefully pressing the trigger to machinegun mashing it... Read more →


Remington sends out many of their shotguns and weapons based on shotguns with two dimples in the magazine tube. This was a manufacturing shortcut for Remington, but the effect is that it prevents installation of any magazine extension on the weapon. So if your Remington has dimples, no matter whether you want to add a Suarez Plus one, or any other company's extensions, it will not work right, and you will not be able to add any more rounds than the four that fit in the dimpled magazine. Solutions? Remove the dimples. Many will try to do this at home with varying success, often damaging the magazine tube or leaving unsightly holes in the tube. The problem is that if you mess it up, it creates far more problems than sending your 870 to us for work. A far better solution is to send the 870 to us for dimple removal. Our gunsmiths have the tooling and expertise to make the dimples go away and allow you to mount any magazine extension you wish on your 870. REMOVE THE DIMPLES... Read more →


Time for a perspective check. Every so often, the temptation returns to us all. It could be the Youtube video with the cool guy doing something really fast. It could be the competitive shooter running a stage. But the bug nibbles on your earlobe. "Gooooooo fassssssterrrrr". I have my opinions on this. I have read all the old time killers. Askins was the quintessential killer. I read everything about him. I think we would have been the best of friends actually. I have read Jordan. He is reported to have done some killing but nothing of record that I can find. And Bryce...he was quite the killer. And I worked with a great many killers in the old days. What all the killers shared as of the utmost importance was not speed. What the killers shared was not blinding speed. It was the ability to make a deliberate decision to kill that man standing there in front of them, diregarding whether that man be in the process of deciding what to do, drawing a weapon, or already have begun shooting.... Read more →