This last trip home from Omaha Nebraska I began work on a book that will change the training world. I began writing the book based on the seminar series - Killing Within The Law. In writing the outline and in discussions with my staff of homicide investigators, we will inevitably have a chapter on weapons and what they may associate you with. I am not a believer that modified weapons will cause you grief like "you-know-who". In fact, we think a good shooting is a good shooting, that modifications to enhance accuracy and efficiency will never be an issue and the homicide investigators we are collaborating with agree. However, certain weapons may cast you in an unfavorable light during the initial police contact. Political designs might not be wise. An grey area example might be a slide festooned with skulls. Not that big a deal but do the police carry skulled weapons? A more drastic example might be the "You're F*cked" dust cover incident as one poignant example. How about the unregistered, no serial number, polymer home made receiver pistols... Read more →


Any gun will hit COM at ten yards...but our goal is retinal shots at that distance. Nuances in grip, how you sights, what portion of the eye you use to see the sights/dot, visual acuity, all contribute in the same way that a rifle zeroed for one man will not be perfectly zeroed for the next man. The iron sights do in fact have to be zeroed if you want something more than point shooting at an auto shop restroom. In class I have seen new pistols with the sights off for anything more than 10 yard COM shooting. Zeroing involves adjusting them for windage and elevation with YOUR MEAT AMMO at a given distance. Most important is windage. That can be done by drifting the rear sight. Elevation is not as crucial, but that can be done by shaving small amounts off the front sight or replacing the front sight. The zero will not be the same with Tula or WWB. I tell guys - zero for killing ammo, but note where your training ammo hits. Zeroing for training... Read more →


Last night I had dinner with a great old friend. He currently lives in Germany. Our friend is fluid in several languages, one of which is German and he focused on firearms training for that community while he worked for me...among other things. He told me a story about a student of his he had trained some years ago here in the USA. The student also lives in Germany, and has sufficient gravitas to have a concealed carry permit in that nation. Germany as you know is very restrictive in these areas and even toy guns are regulated. But the student's job was a high end time piece salesman, and was allowed to carry a weapon...as I said a very rare thing in that country. In any case - he was trained in a very fast-paced and intense few sessions in the Suarez system. A few years later, when opening the store in the early morning hours, he encountered three men that had apparently broken in during the night and were waiting for him. They pointed their pistols at him... Read more →


All new technology is resisted at first. The red dot pistol, or as the competition crowd calls it, "the carry optics pistol", is no different. When we first began milling dovetails for the Trijicon RMR in 2010 there was a great deal of resistance if not abject ridicule. But today we see a plethora of offerings using this concept. The resistance continues however on blogs and social media, parroting the same myth and superstitions about this weapon concept. One of those is that the red dot is not usable in the rain. Recently I was the guest of Rampart Training in Sedalia, Colorado to conduct our flagship course, Red Dot Combat Pistol. We had twenty two students, all accomplished shooters with backgrounds in police, military, concealed carry and competitive shooting sports. We conducted the same course we have conducted for the last few years, but in the middle of the second day, it began to rain. What a great opportunity to see for certain, what a red dot pistol is capable of in the real environment. The rain was constant... Read more →


When I teach a class I tell the students that my job is to teach them at three levels. One is to teach the mind as they need to know why they will be doing what they are doing. I encourage questioning and there are reasons why we do what we do…and they must understand those reasons. Two is the hands, or technical mastery. And three, most importantly is the heart, or how they should feel. How they should feel? Yes, because I am not a technical instructor teaching them the intricacies of bullet golf. I am a teacher of killers. And I am teaching them how to kill evil men…and all the intricacies of that action, whether internal or external. If you carry a pistol with you daily it is in anticipation of, perhaps that very day, of killing another man, or men. Thus all men who carry a weapon are killers, or anticipating becoming killers. If that were not the case, we would even be reading this and our belt lines would be shorn of all weapons. A... Read more →


One of the things that is incessantly being discussed in the CCW/LEO community is the after-event-discourse. In other words, what do you say...or not, after you have shot and killed an adversary. As expected, the variety of advice is as different as people's choices in guns and ammo. A prevailing attitude - promulgated by the liability-mongers - is to simply shut up and say nothing under any circumstances. I disagree and here is why - I have been in more than a few of these and also investigated quite a few of these. I noted some trends and tried to use those trends to my benefits when it was my turn at the plate. First is the fact that you are the only one equipped to tell your story. The bad guys you shot, if they survive, will not be "keeping quiet". They will be telling the police you pulled your gun on them, perhaps create some appearance of racism if they can exploit it, and generally make it look like you are the over-reacting bad guy. If the police... Read more →