Jeff Cooper once said, "The Rifle is the Queen of Weapons". This was of course in reference to the chess piece that can do anything well, and to the surpassing of all other pieces. And it is in that vein that I try and make my rifle program a complete presentation of the rifle and not simply a "long range" school, or a "CQB" school. Rather we wish to address everything that a rifle can do. And incidentally, I do not go along with the notion that a 308 is a rifle and a 223 is a carbine. All my rifles are rifles...regardless of caliber. And since my focus in studying the rifle is from an anti-personnel point of view, all my rifles are assault much as that may annoy the liberals and frustrate the gun apologists. Unlike the pistol or the shotgun (sort of), the rifle is not a defensive weapon. The rifle is for attack and assault. It exists to allow the user to project force and enforce his will on his adversaries. Hardly the "sporting artifact"... Read more →

We run more students through our training courses than most other private sector training organizations in the USA. As such we see a very good cross-section of what the level of skill is across the nation. And by skill, I am referring to the ability to hit a target on demand at various distances, and from various situationally adapted positions. On point we constantly have to fix in our students is the management of the trigger. They stay off the trigger until the last possible moment and then they jump onto that trigger and slap it for a brief instant only to quickly move off trigger again. It is as if an instructor at some point along their formative development convinced them that the trigger was like a hot stove and that it would burn them to the bone if they lingered upon its surface. An analogy that some readers may understand is the novice driver that is afraid of the gas pedal and that stays off it for as long as possible and then is either flooring it or... Read more →

I first began working with what is called “Appendix Carry” when two things happened concurrently. I jammed up my right shoulder doing overhead presses in the gym, and I began to work in some ground fighting Jujitsu into the skill sets (I hate ground fighting, but you never know right?) I had normally carried in the traditional 4:00/5:00 position, but now found my shoulder got very sore reaching back there. You know the story the doc tells you when you tell him it hurts to do something right? He usually says, “well stupid…don’t do that”. Moving the pistol forward of the hip fixed that right away. The other issue was that if I was fighting someone on the ground, it was exceedingly difficult to reach back to grab a pistol that was sandwiched between the ground and my body. Yet Appendix Carry still allowed me to do so. When we tried Appendix carry in our force on force drills we also found that it is very fast to draw from - faster than traditional strong side or crossdraw. And mind... Read more →

Undoubtedly an extremely controversial topic, we used to work it routinely. It involves the concept of shooting an adversary directly through an interior wall. As I recall, and this is back I think early 1990s...a SWAT guy was shot by a bad guy through the wall, which brought up the discusion. In police, and sadly I suspect in your world as well, a great deal of learning takes place once something bad happens. In any was as if nobody had ever thought of that back then so of course, the experimentation was on. The hard part is that urban dwellings may as well be made of paper for all the protection they offer. In fact, if one was to look at it that way it would lead to clearer thinking with tactics. Some guys use that as an indictment of the "stack" tactic, but that is wrong in my opinion. the constraints of the interior environment do place certain limits on how one can move, and specially on how a team can move. Problem = How to keep a... Read more →

MASTERING THE DOUBLE ACTION TRIGGER Back in the 1980s the triggers on SIGs and Berettas and S&Ws were heavier than today...or maybe we are stronger today. I don't know. I came to the DA Semi Auto from the DA Revolver so the first shot was not a big deal to me. One rolled through the trigger in one continual and constant motion on the way out and the shot broke just as the last sight verification was made. But we did work on those DA triggers quite a bit both in dry work and in the gunsmith shop. I tracked down a relatively unknown 'smith named Steve Deladio who ran the Armory at Long Beach Uniforms. He tuned my S&W 686 to ridiculous smoothness and when I used the S&W 5906 I did the same. Steve gave it a fantastic double action pull that could be rolled through like the best revolvers. I never knew that the first shot was so "difficult", or that the transition from double action to single action was such a "problem" until I attended Gunsite... Read more →